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right now. we have strengthened our ties with india. the indian prime minister paying a visit to washington in 2009 was the official state visit. we have the strategic dialogue with india. we see india as a partner for the 21st century and welcome their effort to look east and play a larger role in asia, including the indian ocean. at the same time, we of help realize indonesia's potential as a global partner. there is an excellent relationship between the prime minister and the president. it has been a terrific partnership. third line of the effort, promoting regional cooperation, peaceful resolution of disputes and adherence to human-rights and international law. at a global level, the president strongly supported making the g-20 in the international forum for economic cooperation. this brought a into global economic decision making. -- asia into global economic decision making. president obama became the first u.s. president to join the east asia summit last year in bali. he will participate again this coming week in cambodia. this stress is a critically important aspect of
there are good guys and bad guys, but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has supported, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or subcontinent history, the same empire that controlled the northern third of india also controlled most of pakistan and half of afghanistan, so afghanistan is not foreign to india. it's part of the sub continental conflict system. so we can leave afghanistan, the u.s. can. but india, you will always have deep equities there and if we desert afghan precipitously, you might see india moving closer diplomatically to russia in order to contain things there, in order to make sure afghanistan does not become just a radical islamic extension of pakistani isi control. >> so we are on track in the united states to withdraw from afghanistan over the next two years. tell us what -- what emerges as we withdraw. >> what emerges is that iran will have much greater influenc
of his war policy, it would not reach those people. in annual growth in india of 1%. indians understand what this order was all about. they wanted the confusion of independence. from may, 1947 is important because it is the modern 1776. america is the oldest country of the modern world. the american constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but re
and look at the issues that have to do with pakistan's relationship to india the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus become somewhat less on our relationship to counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media and other links with pakistan that has suffered in last 10 years because of our focus. i guess i come out out of your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that there were two things on the rails which if you know what happened over the last two years is not an easy thing. it was kind of like rolling down the side of the -- with rocks and cactus is is an you don't know how far the ripping go so when i see these keeping things on track it's not easy to keep things on track and pakistan is the way it is mismanaged and the difficulties in our relationship but if we are able to do so after 2014 there will be a prospect that we can open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision ba
's relationship to india, the sequence of events that take place after 2014 when the americans focus, again, as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less on the relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that really suffered in the last ten years because of the focus on ct. i guess i come out to the question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic if we keep it on the rails, which if you know what happened over two years, it's not an easy thing, but like rolling down the side of a are vein, and you don't know how far the ravine goes. when i say "keeping things on track," it's not easy to keep things on track in pakistan because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in the relationship, but if we are able to do so, i think after 2014, there will be a prospect to open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision that's based on this trust, but if we focus on the multilateral and regional issues leading to economic growth, relations w
's relations with india, the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less a relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that have really suffered in the last 10 years because of our focus on ct pics i guess i come up to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that if we can keep things on the risk in which if you know what happened over the last two years, it's not an easy thing, it was like rolling down the side of her routine with rocks and cactus is and you don't know how far the routine goes. so goes. so what is a keeping things on track, it is not easy to get things on track, pakistan. because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in our relationship. but if we're able to do so i think after 2014 there would be a prospect that we can open up the new kind of cooperation, if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision, based on mistrust
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
's in negative territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. while i guess maybe some of us in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure at the fact that in 2008 the favorability ratings for the united states were higher and four out of the five surveyed arab countries, i'm not going to bring that up. [laughter] no, but i think it -- i think it's a big mistake, and, you know, in my view, and
and no one to fill them. then people complain when we have to find employees from places like india and abroad, and they complain that these companies send the problems. king: this is a problem. i sat down with the chamber of commerce and say ted we have 500 empty jobs in your county we can't fill because the people don't have the skills. high-tech manufacturing jobs. there's a disconnect between the educational system and the jobmark, and i think -- for example, just in terms of how complexity is, there's something like 55 different federal job training programs administered by nine different agencies. that's a recipe for both too much money, too much cost, and not enough coordination. so i think what we need to do is to have a closer link -- what told the folks, i'd like if i'm fortunate enough to be elected to put together a skills summit. not a job summit but a skills schmidt, so bring together the community colleges, technical schools, high schools, and university, with businesses to talk about what is actually needed so we can provide our people with the skills. to me it's hea
eclipse. in nigeria children swim in flooded streets. in india, a camel roams a deserted street after sunrise. and in chilchile, a solared pow car getting ready to compete. hot shots, pictures from around the world. kate bolduan is monitoring some other top stories in "the situation room" right now including a tragic ending to a parade honoring u.s. troops. what happened, kate? >> it's a horrible story, wolf. a freight train slammed into a truck carrying veterans and their spouses in a texas parade. four people died and 17 others were hurt in midland yesterday. federal authorities are investigating. initial reports show the train sounded its horn and the crossing gate and lights were working. but there are conflicting reports about whether or not the crossing arms actually were down. also, the coast guard is searching for two missing workers after an oil rig exploded off the coast of louisiana. eleven people were injured, workers were doing maintenance on the rig at the time. we're told it was not producing oil at the time. but 28 gallons of fuel spilled into the water. authorities do
to the u.s. ambassador to india, and executive secretary for the indo-u.s. sub-commission on education and culture. but even more impressive than his resume, is his obvious passion and commitment to fostering essential debate about tough issues. please join me now in welcoming dr. bouton, who, unfortunately for the chicago council, will be leaving there sometime next year. marshall will tell us more about the results of the fascinating new survey, will offer keynote remarks, and then we'll move to the panel. please welcome marshall bouton. [applause] marshall bouton: thank you jane very much. we're thrilled, we're honored, in fact the wilson center has agreed to partner with us in hosting the release of the council's 2012 study. this is a great institution now, very, very capably led by jane and we're delighted to have this opportunity to collaborate with you early in your tenure. so i have a really tough job and that is to try to present the findings of a rather exhaustive study of american thinking about u.s. foreign policy. i'm looking forward very much to the panel and to their com
that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our country just 10, 20 years ago was always mentioned with drug trafficking and corruption and. that was the case. a more important message to leave before this panel is democracy is very important. it is important when the people really want to see their relations. with what happened in colombia, in our case, very strong, important leadership for municipal leaders and, at the same time, and national will to find a role has been critical. after that, then you find international support and cooperation. in the case of colombia, it is an i
six new cardinals telling them to be more like jesus. they're from across the globe, the u.s., india, nigeria, yom i colombia and the philippines. >> we've heard of people converting from different religious but more are going back to thes religious they grew up with. >> hay there. this is a growing social trend. increasing numbers of u.s. adults are returning to the religion under which they were raised. over 90% have gone back to the religion of their childhood. we discovered the structure and values they were raised with. challenging events like hurricane sandy and the tough economy are among the prime reasons. >> for me personally, it was when things looked down, i look up. i think in my experience here, we see a lot of that, where people hit a low and need somewhere to turn and look and they look up and look for god or some kind of faith. >> what is really interesting about rebirths is they appear to be genuinely returning for spiritualty not just support. it's more about reconnecting with their original belief system, shannon. >> they may begin to come back for no, nostalgic re
on the other. states like that -- north korea, pakistan, india, i guess the argument could be made to a certain degree, israel. they are driven to an extent -- certainly by profound insecurity and the notion, which is elevated to a level of one of the 10 commandments in this time, that the way to really get iran is getting rid of -- and it also generates paradoxical implications that the more threatened -- if assad's fall and sense of encirclement and the besieged quality of ron's neighborhood -- simple -- you ron's neighborhood, a simple man that i am, is going to accelerate program,clear weapons and not make them more reasonable. this is a conclusion that is impossible to attack or unwind, and yet it is obviously critical to the discussion of what to do. >> i think the dilemma to the outside world is do we have the talent, the skill to persuade iranian leaders that the acquisition of nuclear materials is secure? there are those who would make the argument that aaron is making. if you look at world experience in the 20th century, having nuclear weapons is a status symbol and literally a deterr
communication technologies will tie together, and these are quotes, tied together indian in india, chicago and the congo. that speech, newt minow's insights, were inspirational to me when i first read them 20 years ago. and the fact is they helped inform today how the fcc thinks about new communication technologies. because the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the main difference of course is the primary new communication technology today is different. it's not broadcast tv or cable tv, satellite. it's broadband internet. so let's start with the opportunities around broadband. the benefits already being delivered by wired and wireless broadband are nothing short of extraordinary. we see here at home in the u.s. are it's no exaggeration to say that high speed internet is reshaping the u.s. economy. we can hardly imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, amazon, wikipedia, without e-mail, texting, or the apple stores people are using to download 100 million apps a day. broadband is also transforming education, enabling distance learning
. after all it's less expensive to live in india where the stars of the movie end up going. i'm here to talk about an at native to youth nation i can't or out sourcing what soon will be a quarter of the population and to argue that the solution to much that ails us as individuals and as a society lace in rethinking the map of life. a map of life that was in many ways set up for three score and ten for those who seem like longer lives of the past century but is inadequate of five score life spans that more people will be living in the 21st century. half of the kids in the developed rgp world are projected to see their 100th birthday. so we can't just extend this life course that was set up for a very different ark of life to one that is really -- has an extra decimal point and and extra 0 to it. so i think what is happening is today that the nature of life is under every bit as radical a transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we're so familiar with. and that the period that's been characterized in these terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the
china and i india, and the sooner we have substitute fuels, and i think for the intermediate future anyway, that's natural gas. as long as we're careful how it's extracted, and it can be extracted safely, can be enormous advantage to us. we can use it through natural gas -- i was on a bus today in portland powered by compressed natural gas. you can -- we can use it to power electric vehicles. at the same time, there needs to be a parallel track with renewables to be there when the gas runs out, the demand increases to the point where the price goes up. to power a vehicle on natural gas is equivalent to $2 a gallon, and it would be the same for home heating. getting off the oil should be the number one priority, and we're finally in a position to do it. this has just come to us in the last four or five years. >> moderator: all right. senator dill? dill: thank you. certainly, gas prices are a challenge to any family in maine trying to get their kids to school, get to the store, or get to work. i do support the president's fuel efficiency standards that will lead to automobiles that re
to push all the money out into the economy that is in india, because everyone is afraid to stand. i'd just like to point out the great depression went on for more than 10 years after this rooseveltian seamers started but if you count the world war ii as a statement, which even barack obama's economic adviser, christina romer has refuted the idea that the war actually ended the depression, you know, none of that, the actual original failure of keynesian was during the depression and yet nobody saw that way. but if we're going to take that serious, take the idea that taking up slack in demand is what we need to do, how much do we need to spend? what is the dollar figure that government needs to put out? >> are you asking? >> yeah. >> there's a lot of debate about this. it's hard to come with a precise figure because we are human beings and we do the best -- >> the keynesians are the ones who believe that everything is trackable to these complex mathematical formulas with all kinds of greek letters and stuff. [inaudible] >> there was internal debate in the obama administration how big is the
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face the accuser is in india or indonesia right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access the facebook. in a lot of cases, there is not an infrastructure of media and communications that you have in the u.s. and a lot of americans will meet you and say facebook is great for gossip and seeing what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you talk to somebody and the middle east, you would hear a different story which is that facebook is providing access to news, to people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what is the means to them. and that is awesome. >> but did you notice things that they actually behave differently with the system? like they share more pictures versus texts? or does basically everyone interact on facebook in the same way? >> one interesting thing is the cameras. a lot of people getting a smart phone for the first time will also have gotten their first camera. that is interesting to the about. if we are about to have four billion smart phones in 2017, that means four millio
with some optimism but a relatively close election. but one thing to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort o
was instrumental in opening up our opening of our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the diplomat warrior what we most admire in our uniform, and our combat commander. i want to say thank you to bill, for you, for doing this, and let's turn this over to you. [applause] >> first big step. doctor, think you're much and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we are getting settled here, have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs in order to serve. and for those of you that missed the chat line, it may be too late. [laughter] but then again, i don't think too many in israel are starting. not the same can be said for others in the world. i wanted to begin with first in case you missed the copies of this on the way in, recommended to your reading and perusal and safety john and steve, thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event. i never get into that in a minute what i think is really important. i'd also like to add my voice to the memory of trip to sell, who contributed as he did it so may things, to this effort just befor
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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